'Good’ Water Governance and Gender Equity: A Troubled Relationship.

Citation:

Cleaver, Frances, and Kristin Hamada. 2010. “‘Good’ Water Governance and Gender Equity: A Troubled Relationship.” Gender & Development 18 (1): 27–41. 

Authors: Kristin Hamada, Frances Cleaver

Abstract:

This paper sets out a framework for understanding water governance, arguing that a narrow focus on gender-sensitive mechanisms of water delivery (such as committees, tariffs, technologies) is insufficient to ensure gender equitable outcomes. We need to expand our analysis of water governance in two directions. Firstly, to understand the ways in which societal resources are allocated (through economic policies, legislation etc) and so shape mechanisms in particular ways. Secondly, to consider how different people are able to influence the outcomes of particular governance arrangements to produce gendered outcomes (for health and well-being, access and livelihoods, and for political voice).

Keywords: water governance, gender, equality, social institutions

Topics: Economies, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equity, Governance, Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Rights

Year: 2010

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