Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy

Citation:

Ehrenreich, Barbara, and Arlie Russell Hochschild. 2002. Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy. New York: Holt Paperbacks.

Authors: Barbara Ehrenreich, Arlie Russell Hochschild

Abstract:

“Important and provocative...There are many tempting reasons to pick up Global Woman.” —The New York Times.

Women are moving around the globe as never before. But for every female executive racking up frequent flier miles, there are multitudes of women whose journeys go unnoticed. Each year, millions leave third world countries to work in the homes, nurseries, and brothels of the first world. This broad-scale transfer of labor results in an odd displacement, in which the female energy that flows to wealthy countries is subtracted from poor ones— easing a “care deficit” in rich countries, while creating one back home.

Confronting a range of topics from the fate of Vietnamese mail-order brides to the importation of Mexican nannies in Los Angeles, Global Woman offers an original look at a world increasingly shaped by mass migration and economic exchange. Collected and with an Introduction by bestselling social critics Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild, this groundbreaking anthology reveals a new era in which the main resource extracted from developing nations is no longer gold or silver, but love. (Amazon)

Topics: Class, Displacement & Migration, Migration, Economies, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Globalization, Livelihoods, Sexual livelihoods

Year: 2002

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