A Gender Perspective on Peace Education and the Work for Peace

Citation:

Brock-Utne, Birgit. 2009. “A Gender Perspective on Peace Education and the Work for Peace.” International Review of Education 55 (2): 205-20.

Author: Birgit Brock-Utne

Abstract:

This article offers a gender perspective on peace education and the work for peace. To what extent are girls and boys in our society being socialised equally or differently when it comes to learning how to care, empathise with others and engage in or endure violent behaviour? Why are women generally more likely than men to support conscientious objectors, and oppose war toys and war itself? Gender is a powerful legitimator of war and national security. As in other conflict situations around the world, gendered discourses were used in the US following 11 September 2001 in order to reinforce mutual hostilities. Our acceptance of a remasculinised society rises considerably during times of war and uncertainty. War as a masculine activity has been central to feminist investigations.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Education, Gender, Women, Men, Girls, Boys, Masculinity/ies, Gendered Discourses

Year: 2009

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