Gender and Negotiation: Some Experimental Findings from an International Negotiation Simulation

Citation:

Boyer, Mark A., Brian Urlacher, Natalie Florea Hudson, Anat Niv-Solomon, Laura L. Janik, Michael J. Butler, Scott W. Brown, and Andri Ioannou. 2009. “Gender and Negotiation: Some Experimental Findings from an International Negotiation Simulation.” International Studies Quarterly 53 (1): 23–47.

Authors: Mark A. Boyer, Brian Urlacher, Natalie Florea Hudson, Anat Niv-Solomon, Laura L. Janik, Michael J. Butler, Scott W. Brown, Andri Ioannou

Abstract:

Increasingly, scholars have taken note of the tendency for women to conceptualize issues such as security, peace, war, and the use of military force in different ways than their male counterparts. These divergent conceptualizations in turn affect the way women interact with the world around them and make decisions. Moreover, research across a variety of fields suggests that providing women a greater voice in international negotiations may bring a fresh outlook to dispute resolution. Using experimental data collected by the GlobalEd Project, this article pro- vides substantial support for hypotheses positing that females generate significantly different processes and outcomes in a negotiation context. These findings occur both in terms of female negotiation behavior and the impact of females as negotiation facilitators ⁄ mediators. 

Topics: Armed Conflict, Conflict Prevention, Gender, Women, Peacebuilding, Peace Processes, Post-Conflict

Year: 2009

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