Gender and Modern Supply Chains in Developing Countries

Citation:

Maertens, Miet, and Johan F. M. Swinnen. 2012. “Gender and Modern Supply Chains in Developing Countries.” The Journal of Development Studies 48 (10): 1412–30. 

Authors: Miet Maertens, Johan F. M. Swinnen

Abstract:

The rapid spread of modern supply chains in developing countries is profoundly changing the way food is produced and traded. In this article we examine gender issues related to this change. We conceptualise various mechanisms through which women are directly affected, we review existing empirical evidence and add new survey-based evidence. Our results suggest that, although modern supply chains are gendered, their growth is associated with reduced gender inequalities in rural areas. We find that women benefit more and more directly from large-scale estate production and agro-industrial processing, and the creation of employment in these modern agro-industries than from smallholder contract-farming.

Topics: Development, Economies, Environment, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Livelihoods

Year: 2012

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