Feminist Security Studies and Feminist International Political Economy: Considering Feminist Stories

Citation:

Allison, Katherine. 2015. “Feminist Security Studies and Feminist International Political Economy: Considering Feminist Stories.” Politics & Gender 11 (2): 430–4. doi:http://dx.doi.org.proxy3.library.mcgill.ca/10.1017/S1743923X1500015X.

Author: Katherine Allison

Abstract:

In reflecting upon the divergence of Feminist Political Economy (FPE) and Feminist Security Studies (FSS) one feels puzzled and perhaps even a little embarrassed. How could such a schism occur and be sustained for seemingly so long? This divergence certainly did not appear to characterize the founding of feminist International Relations (IR) when scholars such as Cynthia Enloe (1983, 1989) and Ann Tickner (1992) were attentive to both dimensions and carefully connected issues of gender to the global economy and to understandings of security and militarism. Moreover, to my mind, there is no immediate epistemological or ontological schism between FSS and FPE of the sort that has characterized other feminist divides. The security studies/International Political Economy (IPE) split seems to be more one of empirical focus that does not require a painstaking and perhaps ultimately futile attempt to suture the feminist IR body back together. Indeed, recent and highly illuminating work on the connections between gender violence and global and local political economies (Meger 2014; True 2012a) would suggest no reason why we should not simply press ahead with the task of reconnection and driving feminist IR forward to new and insightful places.

Topics: Feminisms, Militarism, Political Economies, Security, Violence

Year: 2015

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