Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries

Citation:

Seguino, Stephanie, and Caren Grown. 2006. “Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries.” Working Paper 446, Levy Economics Institute, Bard College, Dutchess County, NY.

Authors: Stephanie Seguino, Caren Grown

Abstract:

This paper reviews evidence of the gender effects of globalization in developing economies. It then outlines a set of macroeconomic and trade policies to promote gender equity. The evidence suggests that while liberalization has expanded women’s access to employment, the long-term goal of transforming gender inequalities remains unmet and appears unattainable without state intervention in markets. This paper sets forth some general principles that can produce greater gender equality, premised on shifting from economies that are profit led and export oriented to those that are wage led and full-employment oriented. The framework is Kaleckian in its focus on the relationship between the gender distribution of income and macroeconomic outcomes. (Levy Economics Institute) 

Topics: Development, Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Political Economies

Year: 2006

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