The Feminist Economics of Trade

Citation:

Staveren, Irene van, Diane Elson, Caren Grown, and Nilufer Cagatay. 2012. The Feminist Economics of Trade. New York: Routledge.

Authors: Irene van Staveren, Diane Elson, Caren Grown, Nilufer Cagatay

Abstract:

Unravelling the complex relationship between gender inequality and trade, this is the first book to combine the tools of economic and gender analysis to examine the relationship between international trade and gender relations.

It brings together fourteen contributions from a variety of economic perspectives, including structuralist, institutionalist, neoclassical and Post-Keynesian by a range of authors including Lourdes Benería, William Darity, Marzia Fontana and Mariama Williams to demonstrate what feminist economics has contributed to the analysis of international trade, through theoretical modelling, econometric analysis and policy-oriented contributions. It includes evidence from industrialized, semi-industrialized, and agrarian economies, using country case studies and cross-country analysis.

Arguing that trade expansion and reduction of gender inequality can be combined, but only if an appropriate mix and sequence of trade and other economic policies is implemented, this book is key reading for all students of international economics, gender and cultural studies and politics and international relations, amongst other disciplines. (Amazon)

Topics: Economies, Feminisms, Gender, Political Economies

Year: 2012

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