Female Suicide Bombers

Citation:

Zedalis, Debra D. 2004. Female Suicide Bombers. Honolulu: University Press of the Pacific.

Author: Debra D. Zedalis

Abstract:

Suicide bombers are today’s weapon of choice. Terrorists are using suicide bombers because they are a low cost, low technology, and low risk weapon. Suicide bombers are readily available, require little training, leave no trace behind, and strike fear into the general population. The success of suicide bombers depends upon an element of surprise, as well as accessibility to targeted areas or populations. Both of these required elements have been enjoyed by women suicide bombers. Female suicide bombers were used in the past; however, the recent spate of them in different venues, in different countries, and for different terrorist organizations forces us to study this terrorist method.

This research paper reviews historical female suicide bombers, focuses on female suicide bomber characteristics, analyzes recent changes in application by various terrorist organizations, and provides implications of change within a strategic assessment of future female suicide bombings.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Combatants, Female Combatants, Gender, Women, Terrorism

Year: 2004

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