An Experiment on Corruption and Gender

Citation:

Rivas, M. Fernanda. 2008. “An Experiment on Corruption and Gender.” Working Paper, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History, University of Granada 806 (January).

Author: M. Fernanda Rivas

Abstract:

There exists evidence in the social science literature that women may be more relationship- oriented, may have higher standards of ethical behavior and may be more concerned with the common good than men are. This would imply that women are more willing to sacrifice private profit for the public good, which would be especially important for political life. A number of papers with field data have found differences in the corrupt activities of males and females, nonetheless they have drawbacks that may be overcome in a lab experiment. The aim of this paper is to see experimentally if women and men, facing the same situation behave in a different way, as suggested in the field-data studies or, on the contrary, they behave in the same way. The results found in the experiment show that women are indeed less corrupt than men. 

 

Keywords: corruption, gender, experiment

Topics: Corruption, Economies, Gender, Women, Men, Gender Roles, Political Participation

Year: 2008

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