Emotions and Activism for Former So-Called ‘Comfort Women’ of the Japanese Occupation of the Netherlands East Indies

Citation:

McGregor, Katharine. 2016. “Emotions and Activism for Former So-Called ‘Comfort Women’ of the Japanese Occupation of the Netherlands East Indies.” Women’s Studies International Forum 54 (January): 67–78. doi:10.1016/j.wsif.2015.11.002.

Author: Katharine McGregor

Abstract:

This paper begins to chart the history of the understudied topic of Indonesian activism for the so called ‘comfort women’ of the Japanese military from World War Two. It asks how and why activists in the specific historical context of New Order Indonesia, the cultural context of Indonesia, the global rise in human rights claims and a new openness to war redress in Japan were variously constrained and enabled in their advocacy. Drawing on recent research into the history of emotions and social movements the paper analyses how and why Indonesian activists appealed to certain emotions to gain support within Indonesia and Japan for compensation. A focus on emotions and the political and cultural contexts surrounding early Indonesian activism allows us to better understand the local framing, reception and outcomes of this global protest movement in Indonesia.

Topics: Armed Conflict, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militaries, Rights, Human Rights Regions: Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Indonesia, Japan

Year: 2016

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