Doing Gender and Development: Understanding Empowerment and Local Gender Relations

Citation:

Sharp, Joanne, John Briggs, Hoda Yacoub, and Nabila Hamed. 2003. “Doing Gender and Development: Understanding Empowerment and Local Gender Relations.” Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 28 (3): 281–95.

Authors: Joanne Sharp, John Briggs, Hoda Yacoub, Nabila Hamed

Abstract:

A major dilemma in Gender and Development (GAD) work is why it is that sometimes women may feel better off colluding with gendered structures that ensure their continued subordination rather than seeking approaches that will allow them to break free of this. Kandiyoti (1988 Gender and Society 2 274-90) has identified this apparent collusion as 'patriarchal bargains', which offer women greater advantages than they perceive can be achieved by challenging the prevailing are therefore reluctant to engage in empowering activities that may challenge their gendered bargain. This paper explains this dilemma in the context of GAD work undertaken with Bedouin women in Southern Egypt.

Topics: Development, Gender, Women, Gendered Power Relations, Patriarchy Regions: Africa, MENA, North Africa, Middle East Countries: Egypt

Year: 2003

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