On Australia’s Doorstep: Gold, Rape, and Injustice

Citation:

Knuckey, Sarah. 2013. “On Australia’s Doorstep: Gold, Rape, and Injustice.” The Medical Journal of Australia 199 (3): 1.

Author: Sarah Knuckey

Annotation:

Summary:

"Many Australians, like others in Western countries that are home to the world’s largest mining companies, benefit economically from extractive industries. We want mine operations to be socially and environmentally responsible, and we expect our governments to fairly regulate corporate activity to prevent or mitigate harm.

But some communities in Papua New Guinea bear the brunt of poorly regulated extractives projects, carried out with insufficient attention to their social impacts. When things go wrong, harms can be compounded by justice and health care systems ill equipped to respond effectively. Australian health professionals have expertise in many of the problems facing those living near PNG mines, and could have much to offer, working in partnership with local communities."

(Knuckey, 2013, p. 1).

Topics: Economies, Extractive Industries, Governance, Health, Justice, Multi-national Corporations, Sexual Violence, Rape Regions: Oceania Countries: Australia, Papua New Guinea

Year: 2013

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