Bring Me Men: Military Masculinity and the Benign Façade of American Empire, 1898 - 2001

Aaron Belkin

October 31, 2012

UMass Boston

Reflecting on some of the unintended consequences of the successful campaign to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," Aaron Belkin notes that the strategies he pursued required him to glorify both the military and American foreign policy more broadly, thus adding to the ever-increasing militarization of American culture and politics. He wrote the book Bring Me Men in an effort to have a countervailing effect. In it, he exposes the complex contradictory masculinities required by the American military, their profound effects on American culture, and their links to empire.

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