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Vietnam

Land Reform and Welfare in Vietnam: Why Gender of the Land Rights Holder Matters

Citation:

Menon, Nidhiya, Yana Van der Meulen Rodgers, and Alexis R. Kennedy. 2017. “Land Reform and Welfare in Vietnam: Why Gender of the Land Rights Holder Matters.” Journal of International Development 29 (4): 454–72.

Authors: Nidhiya Menon, Yana Van der Meulen Rodgers, Alexis R. Kennedy

Abstract:

Vietnam’s 1993 Land Law created a land market by granting households tradable land-use rights. This study uses mixed methods to analyze whether increased land titling led to improvements in household economic security and whether land titles in women’s and men’s names had different effects. Using a matched sample of households from Vietnam’s 2004 and 2008 Household Living Standards Survey, we find that land-use rights held exclusively by women or jointly by couples result in beneficial effects that include increased household expenditures, greater women’s self-employment, and lower household vulnerability to poverty. Results from interviews conducted in Vietnam support these conclusions by indicating that women with sole or joint ownership of land enjoyed greater well-being and higher status.

Keywords: Vietnam, Property Rights, land reform, gender, economic security, land-use certificates

Topics: Economies, Poverty, Gender, Households, Rights, Land Rights Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2017

(Im)possible Futures: Liberal Capitalism, Vietnamese Sniper Women, and Queer Asian Possibility

Citation:

Ly, Lynn. 2017. “(Im)Possible Futures: Liberal Capitalism, Vietnamese Sniper Women, and Queer Asian Possibility.” Feminist Formations 29 (1): 136–60.

Author: Lynn Ly

Abstract:

This article examines the ways Vietnamese sniper women have been narrated and imagined in North America. Part nightmare, farce, icon, historical figure, and real person, the weaponized Vietnamese woman was a troubling figure to comprehend for US soldiers and the public alike. Navigating across historical, aesthetic, and performative texts, the article thinks through the different authorized narratives about this figure, and the queer futures made unintelligible in their making. It argues that liberal capitalism plays an important role in the determination of the relationship between past to present, and what may be imagined as possible, now and in the future. Vietnamese women soldiers during the US war in Vietnam (1955-1975) both frustrate and realize a queer Asian diasporic desire for historical ground on which to challenge racialized, gendered, and sexual epistemological regimes of the war. That is, while militant Vietnamese women were used as evidence of liberal capitalist logics, they also often failed to complete its fantasies, opening up important alternative and queer pasts--ones that inevitably fail to reach dominant conceptions post-Vietnam War presents, but also, for that very reason, critically arrive at an alternative modality for living in the present as a queer Asian and Vietnamese woman.

Keywords: liberal capitalism, militarism, queer Asian women, queer of color critique, time studies, transpacific studies

Topics: Armed Conflict, Economies, Gender, Women, LGBTQ, Military Forces & Armed Groups, Militarism, Post-Conflict, Race, Sexuality, Violence Regions: Americas, North America, Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2017

Land Tenure, Gender and Globalization: Research and Analysis from Africa, Asia and Latin America

Citation:

Tsikata, Dzodzi, and Pamela Golah. 2010. Land Tenure, Gender and Globalization: Research and Analysis from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre.

Authors: Dzodzi Tsikata, Pamela Golah

Abstract:

Drawing from field research in Cameroon, Ghana, Viet Nam, and the Amazon forests of Brazil, Bolivia, and Peru, this book explores the relationship between gender and land, revealing the workings of global capital and of people's responses to it. A central theme is the people's resistance to global forces, frequently through an insistence on the uniqueness of their livelihoods." "For instance, in the Amazon, the focus is on the social movements that have emerged in the context of struggles over land rights concerning the extraction of Brazil nuts and babatu kernels in an increasingly globalised market. In Viet Nam, the process of 'de-collectivising' rights to land is examined with a view to understanding ho* gender and other social differences are reworked in a market economy." "The book addresses a gap in the literature on land tenure and gender in developing countries. It raises new questions about the process of globalisation, particularly about who the actors are (local people, the state, NGOs, multinational companies) and the shifting relations amongst them. The book also challenges the very concepts of gender, land and globalisation. (Abstract from WorldCat)

Annotation:

Table of Contents:
1. Introduction
Dzodzi Tsikata 
 
2. Gender, Land Tenure and Globalisation: Exploring the Conceptual Ground
 Fiona D. Mackenzie 
 
3. Gender, Globalisation and Land Tenure: Methodological Challenges and Insights
Allison Goebel
 
4. Economic Liberalisation, Changing Resource Tenures and Gendered Livelihoods: A Study of Small-Scale Gold Mining and Mangrove Exploitation in Rural Ghana
Mariama Awumbila and Dzodzi Tsikata 
 
5. The Politics of Gender, Land and Compensation in Communities Traversed by the Chad- Cameroon Oil Pipeline Project in Cameroon
Joyce B.M. Endeley
 
6. Facing Globalisation: Gender and Land at Stake in the Amazonian Forests of Bolivia, Brazil and Peru 
Noemi Miyasaka Porro, Luciene Dias Figueiredo, Elda Vera Gonzalez, Sissy Bello Nakashima and Alfredo Wagner B. de Almeida 
 
7. Gender, Kinship and Agrarian Transitions in Vietnam 
Steffanie Scott, Danièle Bélanger, Nguyen Thi Van Anh, and Khuat Thu Hong 
 
8. Conclusion: For a Politics of Difference
Noemi Miyasaka Porro

Topics: Extractive Industries, Gender, Globalization, Land grabbing, Livelihoods, Rights, Land Rights Regions: Africa, Central Africa, West Africa, Americas, South America, Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Cameroon, Ghana, Peru, Vietnam

Year: 2010

Gender and Agrarian Reforms

Citation:

Jacobs, Susie. 2013. Gender and Agrarian Reforms. New York: Routledge International Studies of Women and Place.

Author: Susie Jacobs

Abstract:

The redistribution of land has profound implications for women and for gender relations; however, gender issues have been marginalised from theoretical and policy discussions of agrarian reform. This book presents an overview of gender and agrarian reform experiences globally. It also includes case studies from Latin America, Asia, and Africa (WorldCat).

Annotation:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1: Theoretical perspectives

Chapter 2: Debates over agrarian reform

Chapter 3: Concepts for a gendered analysis of agrarian reform

Chapter 4: The gendered effects of household models of land reform

Chapter 5: Collectives and decollectivisations

Chapter 6: Gender and agricultural collectives : Soviet-type economies

Chapter 7: China : from collectivisation to the household responsibility system

Chapter 8: Viet Nam : egalitarian land reform

Chapter 9: Household models of reform and alternatives

Chapter 10: Mobilisation and marginalisation : Latin American examples

Chapter 11: Land reforms, customary law, and land titling in sub-Saharan Africa.

Topics: Gender, Women, Men, Gender Roles, Rights, Land Rights, Women's Rights Regions: Africa, Americas, Central America, South America, Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Europe Countries: China, Vietnam

Year: 2013

Gender Justice: The World Bank’s New Approach to the Poor?

Citation:

Schech, Susanne, and Sanjugta Vas Dev. 2007. “Gender Justice: The World Bank’s New Approach to the Poor?” Development in Practice 17 (1): 14–26. 

Authors: Susanne Schech, Sanjugta Vas Dev

Abstract:

Gender inequality is now widely acknowledged as an important factor in the spread and entrenchment of poverty. This article examines the World Development Report 2000/01 as the World Bank's blueprint for addressing poverty in the twenty-first century, together with several more recent Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs), with a view to analysing the manner in which gender is incorporated into the policy-making process and considering whether it constitutes a new approach to gender and poverty. It is argued that the World Bank's approach to poverty is unlikely to deliver gender justice, because there remain large discrepancies between the economic and social policies that it prescribes. More specifically, the authors contend that the Bank employs an integrationist approach which encapsulates gender issues within existing development paradigms without attempting to transform an overall development agenda whose ultimate objective is economic growth as opposed to equity. Case studies from Cambodia and Vietnam are used to illustrate these arguments.

Keywords: aid, East Asia, South Asia, Governance and public policy, Gender and Diversity

Topics: Development, Economies, Poverty, Gender, Gender Mainstreaming, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality, Gender Equity, International Financial Institutions, Justice Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Cambodia, Vietnam

Year: 2007

Political Responses to Dam-Induced Resettlement in Northern Uplands Vietnam

Citation:

Dao, Nga. 2016. “Political Responses to Dam-Induced Resettlement in Northern Uplands Vietnam.” Journal of Agrarian Change 16 (2): 291–317. doi:10.1111/joac.12106.

Author: Nga Dao

Abstract:

Dam-induced resettlers in Vietnam manifest their responses and resistances in many different ways. This is a multiple response that expresses itself at many different levels and is spatio-temporally contingent. These actors can be individuals, families, groups of people or communities. Drawing on fieldwork in resettlement sites of the Sơn La hydropower dam in the north-west of Vietnam, this paper explores how political responses and resistance among Sơn La's resettlers were produced through resettlement conditions. It examines intensive and violent struggles over the land and resources surrounding dam sites, and aims to understand why rural disputes in resettlement sites were often between villagers rather than with the state institutions and local authorities.

Keywords: political responses, dam-induced resettlement, uplands, ethnic minority, Vietnam

Topics: Displacement & Migration, Infrastructure, Rights, Land Rights Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2016

Gender and Agrarian Reforms

Citation:

Jacobs, Susie. 2010. Gender and Agrarian Reforms. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Author: Susie Jacobs

Abstract:

The redistribution of land has profound implications for women and for gender relations; however, gender issues have been marginalised from theoretical and policy discussions of agrarian reform. This book presents an overview of gender and agrarian reform experiences globally. It also includes case studies from Latin America, Asia, and Africa. (WorldCat) 

Annotation: Table of Contents: Part I: Theoretical Perspectives 1. Debates Over Agrarian Reform 2. Concepts for a Gendered Analysis of Agrarian Reform 3. The Gendered Effects of Household Models of Land Reform Part II: Collectives and Decollectivisations 4. Gender and Agricultural Collectives: Soviet-type Economics 5. China: From Collectisization to the Household Responsibility System 6. Viet Nam: Egalitarian Land Reform Part III: Household Models of Reform and Alternatives 7. Mobilisation and Marginalisation: Latin American Examples 8. Land Reforms, Customary Law, and Land Titling in Sub-Saharan Africa 9. Conclusion

Topics: Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Land grabbing Regions: Africa, Americas, Central America, South America, Asia Countries: China, Vietnam

Year: 2010

‘Because I Am a Man, I Should Be Gentle to My Wife and My Children’: Positive Masculinity to Stop Gender-Based Violence in a Coastal District in Vietnam

Citation:

Hoang, Tu-Anh, Trang Thu Quach, and Tam Thanh Tran. 2013. “‘Because I Am a Man, I Should Be Gentle to My Wife and My Children’: Positive Masculinity to Stop Gender-Based Violence in a Coastal District in Vietnam.” Gender & Development 21 (1): 81–96. doi:10.1080/13552074.2013.767511.

Authors: Tu-Anh Hoang, Trang Thu Quach, Tam Thanh Tran

Abstract:

Despite the efforts of the government to promote gender equality in Vietnam, gender- based violence is still a critical issue. This article explores a pilot project, the Responsible Men Club, developed and implemented in a coastal district in Vietnam from 2010 to 2012 to work with men to stop violence against their wives. Focusing on masculinity and promoting gender equality in a culturally relevant way significantly improves acceptance of the programme by men themselves and their communities, and enhances its impact. We argue that empowerment, a process often used for women, is also important for men. To construct and encourage a positive, non-violent version of masculinity, men need relevant knowledge, skills, mentoring, and peer support. It is a challenge for gender-based violence programmes to work on increasing public awareness of the issue of violence against women, and reduce society’s tolerance of it, without increasing stigmatisation of and objections to men in general, and to perpetrator men in particular. 

 

Keywords: masculinity, gender-based violence, perpetrator, Vietnam

Topics: Gender, Masculinity/ies, Gender-Based Violence, Gendered Power Relations, Gender Equality/Inequality Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2013

Between Memory and Desire: Gender and the Remembrance of War in Doi Moi Vietnam

Citation:

Werner, Jayne S. 2006. “Between Memory and Desire: Gender and the Remembrance of War in Doi Moi Vietnam.” Gender, Place & Culture 13 (3): 303–15. doi:10.1080/09663690600701087.

 

Author: Jayne S. Werner

Abstract:

This article explores how memory and desire narrate the remembrance of war in doi moi Vietnam through gendered representations. Based on a reading of texts, including fiction and a film shown on television, I argue that memory in wartime texts evokes a landscape of gendered desire and longing. Using Judith Butler's theory of gender melancholy, the article looks at how these texts serve a political project cultivated by the state to displace its own ideal authority.

Topics: Civil Society, Gender, Women, Gender Roles, Gendered Discourses, Nationalism Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2006

Gender in Post-Doi Moi Vietnam: Women, Desire, and Change

Citation:

Drummond, Lisa. 2006. “Gender in Post-Doi Moi Vietnam: Women, Desire, and Change.” Gender, Place & Culture 13 (3): 247–50. doi:10.1080/09663690600700998.

Author: Lisa Drummond

Abstract:

On the eve of doi moi's twentieth anniversary, this group of papers examines the impact of ‘economic renovation’ on the lives of Vietnam's women. Economically, the transformation is unarguable. Socially, the impacts have been as deep, but more uneven and possibly less predictable. These four papers examine different aspects of contemporary Vietnamese women's experience through the lens of desire: mothers confronting the age-old desire for sons under the government's small-family policy, young women's desire to explore sexuality in the strict moral environment of the countryside, piece-workers' desire for better conditions and better lives but unable to mobilize their proletarian class position in a socialist regime, and the desire of authors to evoke women's war-time roles to create a shared national remembrance of suffering, sacrifice, and loss. In their diverse ways, these papers offer unusual insights and rare glimpses into the lives of women in post-doi moi Vietnam.

Topics: Civil Society, Class, Economies, Gender, Women, Political Economies, Post-Conflict, Sexuality Regions: Asia, Southeast Asia Countries: Vietnam

Year: 2006

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